Friday 11 October 2013

FiFo :: a fleeting royal visit

 

Fly in, Fly out :: Fleet-footed Prince Harry of Wales touched down on Australian shores for 48 hours to mark the centenary of the first entry of the Royal Australian Navy’s Fleet into Sydney.

Captain Wales, as he is known in the military, donned his white British Army uniform and sky blue beret for the event. ~ not everyone can wear a blue beret with such aplomb!

harry--afp-salute_2693507k

Prince Harry

Images: SAEED KHAN/AFP/Getty Images

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Wednesday 2 October 2013

Crown Princess Mary of Denmark :: an Aussie gal

 

Crown Princess Mary has opened up about her fairy tale transformation from Tasmanian girl-next-door to future Queen Consort of Denmark in an interview with The Australian Women’s Weekly.

Mary: From commoner to Crown Princess

“I never for a moment thought I’d end up living in Denmark and married to the Crown Prince but he obviously was my missing piece.

Crown Princess Mary is on the cover of the 80th birthday issue of Women’s Weekly, Australia. Mary says she wasn’t seeking fame when she met Crown Prince Frederik in a Sydney bar in 2000, and is constantly surprised by how her life has turned out.  For an insight into the shoot, A day in the life of Crown Princess Mary visit  a story by Juliet Rieden here.

Source: Crown Princess Mary for Women’s Weekly

Photographer: Michelle Holden

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Tuesday 20 November 2012

Queen celebrates Blue Sapphire wedding anniversary

 

Happy 65th Wedding Anniversary  :: Queen Elizabeth II & Prince Philip of Greece celebrate 65 years of marriage this week. Princess Elizabeth married Prince Philip at Westminster Abbey, Nov 20, 1947.

The future Queen used ration coupons to buy the material for her wedding dress, designed by Norman Hartnell, Court Designer since 1938. The lavish gown boasted a 13ft long train that was said to have been inspired by a Boticelli painting.

The big day: Princess Elizabeth and Lt Philip Mountbatten photographed at Buckingham Palace after their wedding ceremony in 1947The big day ~ Princess Elizabeth and Lt Philip Mountbatten photographed at Buckingham Palace after their wedding ceremony.

Queen's Blue Sapphire wedding anniversary: 65 years of landmarksPrincess Elizabeth and The Duke of Edinburgh walking in the grounds of Broadlands during their honeymoon.

 The Love Story

On November 20, 1947, the then Princess Elizabeth married naval Commander Philip Mountbatten at Westminster Abbey. The 21-year old Princess had first met her future Prince in 1934 when they attended the wedding of Philip’s cousin, Princess Marina of Greece to Princess Elizabeth’s uncle, the Duke of Kent. Several years later, when she was only 13, their paths crossed again and the pair began to exchange letters.

By 1946 their courtship had bloomed into romance and Lieutenant Philip Mountbatten, born Prince Philip of Greece and Denmark, renounced his titles and adopted British citizenship before the pair announced their engagement.

In November 1948, roughly a year after their wedding, the couple’s first child, Prince Charles, was born, followed in 1950 by Princess Anne.

In February 1952, the Queen acceded to the throne, following her father George VI’s death. Prince Philip had to abandon his naval career as he became the Queen’s consort.

The Queen is the first British monarch to celebrate a Blue Sapphire wedding anniversary.
1964: What a hat! The Queen's inimitable style shines through at this public engagement, opening the new Forth Road bridge in 1964 wearing a neat winter coat, diamond brooch and statement hatWhat a hat! The Queen’s inimitable style shines through at this public engagement,
opening the new Forth Road bridge in 1964 wearing a neat winter coat, diamond brooch and statement hat.
Shoulder to shoulder: Trooping the Colour in 1953, the Queen takes the salute with Prince Philip by her side1953: Trooping the Colour in 1953, the year of her Coronation,
the newly crowned Queen takes the salute with Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh by her side.

{Images: via Daily Mail UK}

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Wednesday 14 November 2012

Polly & Queen Elizabeth II

 

Australian artist, Polly Borland has beautifully and authenticly captured Her Majesty, The Queen, Elizabeth II with her lense. In 2001, Borland was one of only eight photographers selected to create portraits of Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth II, for The Queen’s Golden Jubilee.

I really liked the bright blue tones and composition of these two portraits of Queen Elizabeth II that are on display in a survey of work by Polly Borland at the University of Queensland Art Museum.

You’ve photographed the Queen – what was that like? Very stressful and very surreal.

Borland had one five-minute sitting with The Queen. In preparation she set up cameras and lighting in front of two backdrops and in her allocated time shot two rolls of film, ending up with ten photographs. Borland has often taken simply-composed, close-up images of subjects in front of carefully selected fabrics. The shimmering gold seen in the portrait of The Queen, a deliberately obvious and kitchy reference to the Jubilee year, was also used by Borland in her 1999 portrait of Monica Lewinsky (who coincidently also wore a blue suit and pearls). In a second portrait of The Queen, approved for use by the Palace but not included in the official portfolio, the subject appears in front of a Marimekko floral backdrop (Unikko Blue) a pattern also favoured by the photographer.

Borland’s photograph of Elizabeth II is certainly among her more unsettling portraits. We are not used to seeing The Queen in such bright light, in such imperfect detail and close proximity. In 1985 Andy Warhol made Reigning Queens, a painting of The Queen based on an official 1977 Jubilee photograph. Borland was very interested in this painting which in one of the most popular paintings held by the National Portrait Gallery in London. Her photograph operates in the same way as one of Warhol’s multiple screen-print portraits, or even one of his Campbell’s soup cans – like a logo or trademark. Though presented with no distinction or fanfare, she is instantly recognisable. Magda Keaney

Polly Borland: Everything I want to be when I grow up exhibition, University of Queensland Art Museum until 25 November.

{Images: Polly Borland, Her Majesty, The Queen, Elizabeth II 2001 Type C photographs, edition of 6}

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Sunday 10 June 2012

Singing in the reign!

 

and their were parties everywhere… union flags and bunting out in force, dancing in the streets, high teas, pomp, ceremony, royal command concerts and parade paying tribute to the monarch.

I love the British sense of humour!

It’s 60 years on the British throne.

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Sunday 10 June 2012

Jubilations!

 

Hooray for the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee ~ the high street stores join the celebrations. Take a royal curtsy and congratulate Her Majesty on sixty wonderful years.

Personalised stationery seller, Smythson celebrating the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee with a floral tribute to the tastemakers of the era of Her Majesty’s Coronation. The window displays were created in collaboration with British illustrator Kerry Lemon, and recreates a quintessential English Rose garden, inspired by the photography of Cecil Beaton and the innovative style and colour palette used by royal florist Constance Spry.

Browns :: store windows have been decorated with an array of patriotic elements. To complete the regal display a creative team, including Ivana Nohel who has designed our origamipaper animals, and the throne and crest illustration by Gemma Milly {see top image}.

Floral Guards Regiment of two rose-jacketed sentries standing to attention outside Hackett.

 

{Images via window display blog}

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Sunday 10 June 2012

Union Jacks + Crowns + Corgis

 

Corgi Blimey ~ Union Jacks, Corgis and Crowns everywhere!

Ted Baker called on corgi friends to welcome customers into the flag-decked shop.

Corgi Maamite Campaign ~ do you love or hate it?

Nicola Waymark, Marketing Manager for Unilever UK comments: “We wanted to create a campaign that not only remained true to the Marmite brand but also communicated its very British sense of humour. 2012 is a big year for Britain, and with Marmite celebrating its 110th Anniversary in the same year as the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee, we felt it was important to mark the occasion…” The Maamite campaign was developed at DDB UK, London.

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Sunday 10 June 2012

Cecil + Elizabeth

 

To celebrate Her Majesty the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee, the Victoria and Albert Museum unveiled an exhibition of 60 royal photographs by Cecil Beaton (1904-1980).

Queen Elizabeth II by Cecil Beaton: A Diamond Jubilee Celebration

From teenage Princess, to mother and sovereign,

the Queen posed for Cecil Beaton’s camera on many occasions from the 1940s to the 1960s.

Queen Elizabeth II, White Drawing Room, 1968 :: The Queen wore a turquoise silk sleeveless shift dress with silver floral embroidery designed by Hardy Amies. 

Queen Elizabeth II in the robes of Sovereign of the Order of the Garter. Music Room, Buckingham Palace 1968


The Queen wearing the Admiral’s Boat Cloak

Some extra tid bits

The Order of the Garter was founded by King Edward III in 1348. It is the most senior British order of chivalry. The Queen wears the robes of the Sovereign of the Order: the blue riband (or sash) and the dark blue velvet mantle, on which is pinned the Garter Star. The star comprises the St George’s Cross within the Garter, surrounded by radiating silver beams. St George is the patron saint of the Order.

The Coronation portraits were widely published and the Queen sent out numerous presentation prints as official gifts. Copies of this full-length portrait were given to the royal family and members of Prince Philip’s family. The Queen’s Coronation gown was designed by couturier Norman Hartnell and exquisitely embroidered with the floral emblems of the countries of the Commonwealth.

The photographs of the British royal family by Sir Cecil Beaton (1904-1980) were central to shaping the monarchy’s public image in the mid-20th century. Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II was still a young princess when she first sat for Beaton in 1942. Over the next three decades he would be invited to photograph the Queen on many significant occasions, including her Coronation Day in 1953.

{Images: Cecil Beaton via Victoria and Albert Museum}

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Sunday 10 June 2012

Princess Elizabeth

 

Regal and beautiful ~ these black and white photos capture a younger Queen ELizabeth II.

Elizabeth Alexandra Mary. Born April 21, 1926 at 17 Bruton Street, Mayfair, to Prince Albert, Duke of York (later King George VI) and Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon, the Dutchess of York.

The family called her Lilibet.

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Sunday 3 June 2012

Bedecked in jewels, Queen Elizabeth 11

 

Jewellery and Gown :: Her Majesty arrived for State Opening of British Parliament wearing a silver gown with crystal embellishments, and a stunning white fur coats.

The Crown :: The Queen wears the King George IV State Diadem crown.

Made by Rundell, Bridge & Rundell in 1820, the diadem features a set of 4 crosses pattée alternating with 4 bouquets of roses, thistles, and shamrocks. The motifs are set on a band of diamond scrollwork between two bands of pearls. The front cross is set with a 4 carat yellow diamond, and the piece features 1,333 diamonds in all.

The crown was made for King George IV. George was a flamboyant man with an extravagant sense of style. The 57-year-old waited a long time to become king, and he wanted his coronation to be the most extravagant one in history. He redesigned costumes and planned for changes and additions to the Crown regalia. To commemorate the relatively recent creation of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, George came up with a new motif: a bouquet of Scotland’s thistle, England’s rose, and Ireland’s shamrock.

Queen Elizabeth II started wearing the diadem after her accession in 1952. She wears it to and from each State Opening of Parliament and for official portraits. That combination of uses has made it one of the most recognizable symbols of her reign ~ it adorns stamps, money, and official images.

The Festoon Necklace :: the three strand diamond necklace was commissioned in 1947 by King George VI to find a use to some of the loose diamonds he had inherited. The necklace consists of three rows of diamonds suspended between two diamond triangles, containing over 150 brilliant cut diamonds. The minimum weight of the necklace is estimated to be 175 carats. Matching diamond earrings were worn.

After arriving, she puts on the Parliament Robe of State and the insignia of the Order of Garter. As is the custom, the Monarch doesn’t put on the Imperial State Crown (which arrives separately) until after she enters the Palace of Westminster.

{Source: Order of Splendor}

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