Sunday 14 July 2013

Tír na nÓg house :: Drew Heath

 

An ‘Otherworld’ is the meaning of Tír na nÓg.  This “ jungle” house is inspired by the overgrown outlying ancient temples at Angkor Wat in Cambodia.

Designed by Drew Heath, this house in McMahons Point, an old harbour-side suburb in Sydney, has just won the NSW Wilkinson Award for Residential Architecture and diflucan no prescription was informed  by a trip to the ancient ruins of Angkor Wat.

Tír na nÓg house by Drew Heath Architects

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Tír na nÓg house by Drew Heath Architects

The garden and summer pavilion are covered with plants that create the cialis for uk ‘jungle’ and the property is protected in parts by a dense bamboo fence. The house seems to disappear into the greenery. The NSW AIA jury chair, Sam Crawford, in summing up the jury decision, said: ‘[Drew] was so inspired [by Cambodia], he attempted to create the sublime in his own home, layering building and landscape in a tight urban setting. He set out to achieve something very ambitious, and we think he’s succeeded.’

You enter the house from a tiny street in Sydney’s McMahon’s Point, an inner north-shore harbour suburb. The late 1900s worker’s cottage is now a pavilion of bedrooms and sleeping spaces.  From this old house you then walk through to the central garden to the new open-plan summer pavilion, once the old cottage’s back yard, but now a beautiful building housing the large kitchen and reading room. The long central table in the canada pharmacy viagra kitchen extends into the central garden, and seats 20.

A glass wall, the full height and width of the kitchen wall, is able to be opened, as one would a large garage door, completely transforming the kitchen into a larger living room/garden space. I asked Mr Heath to give us his comments on the house and the inspiration behind its peculiar, breathtaking design:

‘It’s a community house in that it presents greenery to the suburb, but I also wanted to remove myself from the suburb. I want to live within the suburb in the little village, but I don’t necessarily want to see the things that go on outside it. I don’t mind hearing it and viagra without a doctor you hear the buying viagra online without a prescription hum of the city and the traffic going by, but I actually wanted to live in a place where I felt I had complete control of the aesthetic and the materials and so I have used the landscape around us, be it as fencing or a green back-drop, so I see no other architecture.’

‘A lot of the things I do have no definition, so when we presented this roof garden/terrace deck to council, I just claimed it as outdoor landscape space, whether it is on the ground or not, and push it through as that so the building is a simple form. I have tried to make it almost terrace-like from the exterior, [but] it’s a building that’s not walled in, that appears as a green landscaped building where the back façade is completely covered in vine. There is no architectural façade there, there’s no grand architectural statement, there is just a gift of things growing, which is probably better than an architectural façade. We have young twins [nearly two years old] and the children develop their own barriers very quickly. The bamboo that surrounds the house is a fast growing screen and wall, it becomes so dense it just becomes the fence and the barrier, so over time bamboo is impenetrable. Why make a fence when you can grow a fence.’

‘My major architectural challenge was not the summer pavilion, but renovating the old worker’s cottage. I liked the idea of having a contrast between the old and new. It obviously made sense for us to sleep back in the house, in a series of rooms, so there are various little nooks and get viagra without prescriptions crannies throughout the building. The whole house is designed to sleep 10–12 people. There’s a winter bathroom [in the old house] and a summer bathroom [in the central garden], which is an outdoor bathroom, really a bath house.  It’s open on two sides to the bamboo and the landscape and the shower is underneath an open skylight. This whole area is a hose-out area, so it doesn’t matter how wet it gets, how intense the rain is.’

‘When it gets cold we use the winter bathroom, which is really just a little room on the side of the old house.  It’s only  800mm wide, and about  4 metres long. Sometimes I have referred to it as a metre box attached to the side of the house. It was the minimum size I thought we could do. Things like the basin are recessed back into the old chimney, so everything is tucked into whatever space it can be. [Yes] the window in the bathroom looks from the shower over the neighbour’s garden, but there is no privacy issue here, the window steams up and that becomes the curtain. No-one believed it would work, but it does perfectly.

Connecting with the outside
Source: By Design on Radio National, ABC. Story here.
Images: Brett Boardman

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Sunday 26 August 2012

6 shoes, a handbag, 9 cars, a swing, a piano and a map…

 

The Pothole Gardener took his green thumbs to Milan for design week. And Las Vegas is next!

{Source: Pothole Gardener blog}

 

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Sunday 26 August 2012

pothole gardener ♥

 

This will make your heart sing ~ Steeve Wheen brings a little greenery to the streets of East London in his ‘ThePothole Gardener‘ project.

Australian born Londoner Steeve Wheen fills pesky potholes in roads and buy pfizer cialis online footpaths with soil and living plants, decorating them with miniature props to create gorgeously tiny worlds.

The project – which Wheen describes as part creative pursuit, part passion and part urban experiment – was inspired by a guerrilla gardening efforts, as well as a wish to bring a little greenery to the city streets ‘one pothole at a time’.

Steve Wheen started the Pothole Gardener project as part of a university course. Over time, the project turned into a blog that follows his gardening efforts around East London. Wheen describes his endeavors as “part art project, part labour of love, part experiment, part mission to highlight how s*** our roads are – the pictures and gardens are supposed to put smiles on peoples faces and alert them to potholes!”

Visit Steve Wheen’s Blog the pothole gardener And visit My Modern Met for more pics.

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Sunday 13 May 2012

Dreaming of dining in the tree tops…

 

Lofty nest dining with beautiful views of the beaches and waiters gliding in on a rope-line to bring platters of exotic cocktails and thai-inspired dishes :: Soneva Kiri Tree Resort, Thailand

The Soneva Kiri resort located on the remote island of Koh Kood features these Eco-pods that hang in the nearby surrounding trees, where you can relax, dine and even sleep if you’d prefer.

{Images: Soneva Kiri resort, a “six star” Six Senses eco-resort located in Koh Kood via Free York}

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Monday 30 April 2012

happy eco monday

 

Today was too beautiful to be at work, and I was dreaming of a picnic by the water!

A new generation of eco-friendly designware leaves a lighter footprint, enriching our lives while caring for the planet. These beautiful, practical furnishings and accessories pay both global and aesthetic dividends.

Great styling by Glen Proebsteland the photographer Sharyn Cairns. Together they have created a beautiful story about eco-friendly homeware, furnishing and accessories. See the full story here.

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Friday 6 April 2012

oh, dreaming of a garden lunch

 

I’m inspired to put the couch in the garden and invite friends for lunch outdoors to relax in this gorgeous space!

{Image via Vintage}

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Wednesday 18 January 2012

Happy Haus

 

I am interested in modular homes at the moment. And they are great for a beach shack or a mountain retreat! This Donovan Hill’s Happy Haus is a ‘ready made’ home solution that is fully adaptable, transportable and climatically sensitive in its design.

The Happy Haus is designed so each module can be easily transported to a new site, or relocated from an existing address as living requirements change. The flexible design of the modules means that the Happy Haus is able to be accommodated by most sites, and can be both ‘stand alone’ or combined to include garden and outdoor spaces.

{Images via House Variety}

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Tuesday 17 January 2012

beach – sunshine = books + hiking

 

The beach has its own beauty in the rain with muted colours in the softened light,

and nature has a reprieve from the scortching summer sunrays,

the rain drops glistening and nurturing the earth.

{Images via 1. 79 Ideas; 2. When in Oz}

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Friday 6 January 2012

festival + camping

 

A wonderful day was spent at Woodford Folk Festival listening to live music and viagra cheap chilling out. At night I fell asleep in the tent listening to music wafting from the blues tent ~ happy times.

 

{Images: 1-5 VOGUE Italia October 2001, photographed by Mikael Jansson; 6-7 photographed by Twig Hutchinson}

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Tuesday 11 October 2011

The world’s most expensive salad at the Naked Garden

 

Hydroponic urban gardening was spectacularly demonstrated by David Domoney’s “Naked Garden”. 

The hydroponically grown lettuces and tomatoes are the ingredients used

to create the world’s most expensive salad, costing $637.

… the plants are incredibly expensive because they are grown hydroponically. They are grown without soil and water and nutrients are sprayed direct to the roots. But also this means that the plants on display are all kept alive right till the point they are put in the salad so this is the freshest green salad you will ever eat. Unfortunately it is also the most expensive as the growing of the plants like this is very labour intensive.

“The plants are ‘in the nude’ as there is no soil and you can see all the roots – they are growing in glass.

I wanted people to be able to see the secret side to plants.”

His idea was to expose the beauty of naked roots and to promote soilless culture.

The transparent garden furniture was well chosen to fit with the clear containers.

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