Monday 10 October 2011

    One Day

     

    I laughed and cried watching the film, One Day.

    And lusted after the stunning apartments!

    There’s some stunning interiors created by production designer Mark Tildesley.

    The film depicts the friendship and love between Emma Morley and Dexter Mayhew through scenes from one day, July 15th, of each year for twenty years.  Emma (Anne Hathaway) and Dexter (Jim Sturgess)  meet on the night of their college graduation – July 15th, 1988 and begin a friendship that will last a lifetime.

    Emma is a working-class girl of principle and ambition who dreams of making the world a better place. Dexter is a wealthy charmer who dreams that the world will be his playground. For the next two decades, every July 15th reveals to us how “Em” and “Dex” are faring, as their friendship ebbs and flows with the passing of the years. Through laughter and romance, heartbreak and exhilaration, they experience the grandeur of life. Somewhere along their journey, these two people realize that what they are searching and hoping for has been there for them all along.

    St. Swithin’s Day :: The ‘One Day’ of the book, the film, and Dexter and Emma’s love and lives is July 15th, which is also the date of St. Swithin’s Day.  In British folklore, there is a rhyme that reads:

    St Swithin’s day if thou dost rain For forty days it will remain St Swithin’s day if thou be fair

    For forty days ’twill rain no more 

    The feast day of St. Swithin (sometimes written as St. Swithun) falls every year on July 15th. Legend has it that if it rains on that day, then it will rain every day for forty days; and that if the sun shines on that day, then the weather will be beautiful for forty days.

    The legend is rooted in a real man; St. Swithin himself was an Anglo-Saxon Bishop at Winchester Cathedral in the ninth century AD. Although tradition dictated his being buried inside Winchester Cathedral, he was a humble man; on his deathbed, he asked if he could be buried in the churchyard so that the rain could fall on him and so that people could walk close to him. Although his wishes were initially respected, nine years after his death the body was moved to a shrine within the Cathedral. His displeasure was registered when a massive storm broke and continued for forty days. The legend began, and endures to this day.

    Adapted from the internationally praised and bestselling novel, One Day by David Nicholls. The film is directed by Lone Scherfig. It stars Anne Hathaway, Jim Sturgess, Patricia Clarkson, Tom Mison.

    Actress Anne Hathaway said she was clandestinely given the script as the film was set in the United Kingdom and director Scherfig wasn’t looking for any American actresses for the part. Hathaway flew to London for a meeting with Scherfig to explain why she should get the part.

    Hathaway later said it was “the worst meeting of my life… I was just inarticulate”, but on leaving Hathaway wrote out a list of songs for Scherfig to listen, saying, “I clearly didn’t communicate to you what I needed to today. But I think these songs can do it for me.” Scherfig did listen to them, which led to Hathaway getting the part.

    Production ::  Filming took place on location in  Scotland, England  and France.  In Edinburgh, the city where Dexter and Emma first meet, features various landmark locations, including Arthur’s Seat, were used. Production moved to London. Parliament Hill Lido in north London was used for scenes in which Emma, of varying ages, swims. Filming took place inside a house in Granville Road in Stroud Green for scenes involving Jim Sturgess and Romola Garai. Westminster Cathedral was used for a wedding sequence.

    In France, filming took place at the Palais Royal, for a tête-a-tête between Dexter and his mother; at the venerable Gare du Nord, arguably the busiest train station in Paris; and up and down the Canal Saint Martin, among other locations depicting two different years in the story.  Filming in France took place in Dinard, a town close by to St. Malo, along the Brittany coast. The picturesque French town provided the locations of harbor exteriors and a shimmering seawater pool, as well as the beach La Guimorais. Given the book’s setting for Dex and Em’s holiday scenes is Greece,  a seaside club was turned into the Cafe Paradis, designed to ape Greek themes.

    About the Production {excerpt below from hello bristol}

    Falling in Love with a Love Story 

    “It is a love story”, affirms David Nicholls, the author of the internationally praised bestselling 2009 novel One Day and also the screenwriter of the 2011 movie adaptation One Day. “It’s also about friendship and family, nostalgia and regret, and the way that our hopes and dreams don’t quite come true – at least, not in the way that we’re expecting them to. There is a bittersweet quality to it. I wanted to write an old-fashioned – I suppose it is that - romance showing the ups and downs of a relationship over a long period of time. 

    Nicholls spent two years working on the novel. “I was writing other things alongside it, he notes. “Also, it required a lot of planning beforehand, like a jigsaw puzzle; planting seeds in one year of the story that turned into plot points in another. I had to work out what was going to happen on the many July 15ths. I didn’t write One Day as a screenplay in disguise but I love writing dialogue and fiction, so perhaps inevitably there was a filmic quality.

    “Writing One Day was a real pleasure.

    I wrote the first half and then took a break from it for about six months;

    then went back to revise the first half and carried on to the second half. 

    Film producer Nina Jacobson, well-versed in recognizing books’ potential as movies and shepherding them to the screen, was struck by how much One Day affected her as she read it. She says, “I fell in love with the characters. The story is very universal. These characters, Emma and Dexter, and their journey truly speak to the way in which you transform after graduating from college and living your life; who you are then, and who you are twenty years later.

    “It takes us time to grow up and until we do, we can’t necessarily be with the person we’re meant to be with. That time is necessary, yet it’s also something you can’t get back. So there is a wistful tone to the story.”

    Lone was our first choice for the movie, says the producer. As it happens, notes Scherfig, Academy Award nominee Anne Hathaway had read the script. She liked Emma so much that she flew to London to talk to me and tell me why she should have the part! Anne shares Emma’s humor and strength. She is a highly experienced actress who lends huge warmth and fragility to the part, more than anyone else I can imagine.  Hathaway muses,

    If you’re lucky, you can find a story that really moves you.

    If you’re lucky, you can find a character who speaks to you.

    With One Day, I found both. 

    Scherfig describes Emma as “witty, insecure, hard-working, and bookish. There’s always the question that we and she are asking; is Dexter too privileged for her, is he too self-assured? With her vast range as a performer, Anne captures those doubts but also all of Emma’s more tenacious qualities – and her ability to see through Dexter’s façades.

    By the time the movie One Day began filming, the novel One Day was already a bestseller around the world. It had been sold for publication in 31 different languages – a rarely reached benchmark for a book these days – and would go to 1 on the bestseller lists in the U.K., Italy, and Sweden; 2 on Germany’s; and 3 on Russia’s.

    When the book was first published in June 2009 in the U.K. by Hodder & Stoughton, David Nicholls’ novel was heartily embraced by reviewers and the public. Becoming a must-read, it hit 1 first on the hardcover and later on the paperback Sunday Times bestseller charts. The novel won the Galaxy National Book Award for Popular Fiction Book of the Year. Over 400,000 copies have been sold in the U.K.

    One Day was published in the U.S. as a trade paperback original in June 2010 by Vintage Books, an imprint of Random House, Inc.’s Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group. Word of mouth had already spread across the pond, and the novel commenced a 12-week stint on The New York Times Trade Paperback Fiction Bestseller list, rising to the 4 position. There currently are 600,000 copies in print of the Vintage paperback and e-book editions.  Rave reviews accrued through year’s end, as The New York Times Book Review named the novel among the 100 Notable Books of 2010; Entertainment Weekly named it one of  ’The [10] Best Fiction [Books] of the Year’, with Henry Goldblatt citing it as ‘a luscious, beautiful, and ultimately devastating portrait of two soul mates’; and the book also made best-of lists from Barnes & Noble and Amazon, among others.

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    Thursday 7 July 2011

    Happily Ever After :: Anne Hathaway

     

    A simply luxurious life ~ Anne Hathaway gets caught up in a modern day fairy tale in Paris. She was photographed in iconic locations like the Crillon (she caused a major stir getting out of an antique car) and Maxim’s.

    Once upon a time, in 1996, Anne Hathaway spent her fourteenth birthday behind the footlights at the Paper Mill Playhouse in her hometown of Millburn, New Jersey, where she was appearing in a stage version of Gigi, the 1958 movie musical that starred Leslie Caron as a little girl who grows up in the most delightful way. But Hathaway wasn’t playing the title role—she was just a kid in the chorus—and throughout the famous scene at Maxim’s, where Gigi makes her entrance as a woman, she had to sit with her back to the audience, hidden behind a prop.

    Now, on a June afternoon in Paris, Hathaway finds herself front and center in the Art Nouveau dining room of the real Maxim’s for a Vogue cover shoot. Looking like a cross between Caron and Audrey Hepburn, Hathaway has spent the past two days gamely flitting about Paris wearing a series of dazzling creations and a staggering amount of diamonds. Here at Maxim’s, she stands in front of the camera in an embroidered Miu Miu top, her hair swept up into a lofty French twist. When she jokes with the crew (“It’s Holly Golightly meets Marge Simpson”), the photographer, Mario Testino, says, “Anne—less talking, more beauty.” Taking his cue, she gazes at the horizon with gentle melancholy, prompting him to say, “Just like that, just like that. Oh, darling, you’re perfect.”

    “It was true glamour,” Hathaway says later. “Not just the clothes and the jewels but that feeling that glamour can produce in you, which is like a dream.” We are on our way to the Gare du Nord to catch a train to London, where she’s about to start filming the romantic comedy One Day, directed by An Education’s Lone Scherfig. But first the actress decides to pop into Hermès, on Rue du Faubourg St.-Honoré. “I’ve never seen a Kelly bag or a Birkin bag in person,” she tells me, “and at my age, it’s about time.” As she strolls through the store, wearing blue patent leather Sonia Rykiel flats, a flouncy Zara skirt, and a short-sleeved Lanvin T-shirt with a pink silk rose on the shoulder that on her somehow look all-American, shoppers and clerks look up, their soigné indifference giving way to wide grins and low murmurs of “C’est Anne ’Atta-way!” It could be a scene from a sequel to The Princess Diaries, the 2001 cinematic fairy tale that transformed Hathaway, at eighteen, from an aspiring ingenue into Hollywood royalty.

    Moments later, a salesman who, if this actually were one of the Princess movies, would be played by Hector Elizondo, oversees the arrival of a stack of boxes bearing the coveted items in various sizes, colors, and skins. First up: a small brown leather Kelly whose clean, classic lines exemplify the 1950s American glamour of its namesake. Hathaway oohs and aahs with appropriate reverence. But it’s the oversize Birkin, with its hippie-chic quality (and heart-stopping price tag), that really makes her gasp. “It’s Heaven,” she says.

    If what we wear is an expression of who we are, then Hathaway is still exploring—mixing young, bohemian looks with vintage classics. Labels she likes range from 3.1 Phillip Lim, Rag & Bone, and If Six Was Nine to Céline and Isabel Marant. (She is also obsessed with Freddies of Pinewood, whose retro denim she describes as “my new magic jeans, sort of Marilyn Monroe in her off hours.”) With a bag in each hand, Hathaway steps in front of a mirror, studying herself as she turns from side to side. “I think the Birkin would suit me more,” she pronounces. “As gorgeous as the Kelly is, I think it’s something that you mature into.”

    “You are young,” the salesman says.

    Photographer Mario Testino and stylist Tonne Goodman cast Anne Hathaway in the center of a fairy tale for the cover feature of the November 2010 issue of Vogue.

    {Images via rdujour, text source Vogue}

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