Sunday 14 July 2013

Tír na nÓg house :: Drew Heath

 

An ‘Otherworld’ is the meaning of Tír na nÓg.  This “ jungle” house is inspired by the overgrown outlying ancient temples at Angkor Wat in Cambodia.

Designed by Drew Heath, this house in McMahons Point, an old harbour-side suburb in Sydney, has just won the NSW Wilkinson Award for Residential Architecture and was informed  by a trip to the ancient ruins of Angkor Wat.

Tír na nÓg house by Drew Heath Architects

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Tír na nÓg house by Drew Heath Architects

The garden and summer pavilion are covered with plants that create the ‘jungle’ and the property is protected in parts by a dense bamboo fence. The house seems to disappear into the greenery. The NSW AIA jury chair, Sam Crawford, in summing up the jury decision, said: ‘[Drew] was so inspired [by Cambodia], he attempted to create the sublime in his own home, layering building and landscape in a tight urban setting. He set out to achieve something very ambitious, and we think he’s succeeded.’

You enter the house from a tiny street in Sydney’s McMahon’s Point, an inner north-shore harbour suburb. The late 1900s worker’s cottage is now a pavilion of bedrooms and sleeping spaces.  From this old house you then walk through to the central garden to the new open-plan summer pavilion, once the old cottage’s back yard, but now a beautiful building housing the large kitchen and reading room. The long central table in the kitchen extends into the central garden, and seats 20.

A glass wall, the full height and width of the kitchen wall, is able to be opened, as one would a large garage door, completely transforming the kitchen into a larger living room/garden space. I asked Mr Heath to give us his comments on the house and the inspiration behind its peculiar, breathtaking design:

‘It’s a community house in that it presents greenery to the suburb, but I also wanted to remove myself from the suburb. I want to live within the suburb in the little village, but I don’t necessarily want to see the things that go on outside it. I don’t mind hearing it and you hear the hum of the city and the traffic going by, but I actually wanted to live in a place where I felt I had complete control of the aesthetic and the materials and so I have used the landscape around us, be it as fencing or a green back-drop, so I see no other architecture.’

‘A lot of the things I do have no definition, so when we presented this roof garden/terrace deck to council, I just claimed it as outdoor landscape space, whether it is on the ground or not, and push it through as that so the building is a simple form. I have tried to make it almost terrace-like from the exterior, [but] it’s a building that’s not walled in, that appears as a green landscaped building where the back façade is completely covered in vine. There is no architectural façade there, there’s no grand architectural statement, there is just a gift of things growing, which is probably better than an architectural façade. We have young twins [nearly two years old] and the children develop their own barriers very quickly. The bamboo that surrounds the house is a fast growing screen and wall, it becomes so dense it just becomes the fence and the barrier, so over time bamboo is impenetrable. Why make a fence when you can grow a fence.’

‘My major architectural challenge was not the summer pavilion, but renovating the old worker’s cottage. I liked the idea of having a contrast between the old and new. It obviously made sense for us to sleep back in the house, in a series of rooms, so there are various little nooks and crannies throughout the building. The whole house is designed to sleep 10–12 people. There’s a winter bathroom [in the old house] and a summer bathroom [in the central garden], which is an outdoor bathroom, really a bath house.  It’s open on two sides to the bamboo and the landscape and the shower is underneath an open skylight. This whole area is a hose-out area, so it doesn’t matter how wet it gets, how intense the rain is.’

‘When it gets cold we use the winter bathroom, which is really just a little room on the side of the old house.  It’s only  800mm wide, and about  4 metres long. Sometimes I have referred to it as a metre box attached to the side of the house. It was the minimum size I thought we could do. Things like the basin are recessed back into the old chimney, so everything is tucked into whatever space it can be. [Yes] the window in the bathroom looks from the shower over the neighbour’s garden, but there is no privacy issue here, the window steams up and that becomes the curtain. No-one believed it would work, but it does perfectly.

Connecting with the outside
Source: By Design on Radio National, ABC. Story here.
Images: Brett Boardman

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Friday 12 July 2013

Escape to Spain

 

This gorgeous  summer house of Consuelo Castiglione, the Marni designer in Formentera, Spain. It has the charm of contrasts “well balanced” refinement and roughness, smoothness and  hippie chic tone. ”A kind of African paradise”

Source: admagazine // photography: julien oppenheim via 79 Ideas

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Wednesday 10 July 2013

Ice Age :: artist Arjan Benning

 

Dutch photographer, Arjan Benning, photographed this still life series by putting together white, domestic, cluttered scenes. He creates a minimalist aesthetic through the clutter by juxtaposing color against white. I love the little bit of color added to the white such as the mint scoop of ice cream.

To see more or Arjan Benning’s work check out his website or his Behance profile.

Source: Trendland by Jaclyn Hudson.

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Tuesday 9 July 2013

make do and mend

 

Eco-friendly editorial ‘Make Do and Mend’ featured in Vogue UK 2009 recycles ordinary household objects and turns them into couture garments. Polish beauty Malgosia Bela models the DIY recycled regalia the dollar-conscious couture creations that cost $10-$250 to make. And they were captured by my favourite photographer, Tim Walker!

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Stylists: The extraordinary outfits were created by prop stylists Shona Heath, William Tempest and Peter Jensen under the watchful eye of fashion editor Kate Phelan.

Photographer:  Tim Walker.

Source: Editorial from Vogue British Magazine, November 2009 via TFS and Trendhunter.

 

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Tuesday 9 July 2013

quirky and fabulous

 

I am often asked where I found my profile pic… It’s from a British Vogue Magazine shoot, Make Do and Mend and features Polish model Malgosia Bela. 

“A Girl Should Be Two Things: Classy and Fabulous.” Coco Chanel

Source: Editorial from Vogue British Magazine, November 2009

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Monday 8 July 2013

Christian & Karen Boros’s concrete penthouse in a 1942 Bunker {Berlin}

 

After seeing this amazing Berlin apartment, I was inspired by the simplicity of design and line that showcases the art and life of these contemporary collectors.

After looking for a singular space in Berlin, both for living and exhibiting their vast contemporary-art collection, Christian Boros and his wife, Karen Lohmann discovered an old five-story bunker in the central neighborhood of Mitte, Berlin. They were looking for something big and really interesting from a historical point of view. And they found it!

The bunker had been built in 1942 as an air-raid shelter for residents of the area and in 1945, the building was converted into a prison. After the war, it became a warehouse, first for textiles and then for produce.

Since then, the property had undergone various reincarnations: a nightclub, a nonprofit organization, and an exhibition hall—until the couple bought it in 2003.

For the renovation they took their cues from the nearby New National Gallery, designed in the 1960s by Mies van der Rohe. They transformed the building’s roof into a penthouse apartment for themselves, leaving the rest of the floors for exhibition space. “We were inspired by the early works of the Japanese architect Tadao Ando,” Lohmann explains. “He uses smooth concrete with visible shuttering marks to create planes that capture light. We opted for this for the walls, but contrasted the coldness of the concrete with limestone floors.”

From the start, they wanted an ample, open living area for large dinners and get-togethers with friends and fellow art collectors. Boros and Lohmann visited antiques dealers and auction houses, slowly putting together an array of furnishings that would serve as a framework for their art, which includes pieces by Wolfgang Tillmans and Franz Ackermann. Their penthouse alone holds more than 100 works, an eccentric and personal collection that reflects its owners’ spirited and passionate point of view.

Story by Cyril Foiret

Photography by Ailine Liefeld

Architect Agency: www.cmk-architects.com

Source: Trendland 

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Monday 8 July 2013

Hello after far tooooo long, I haven’t forgotten you…..

 

After a hiatus of months I haven’t forgotten you all! It’s been such a busy and exciting year: an adventure in Europe, a house renovation – still in progress and really an overall life reno!

Image:  Zorina, prima ballerina with the George Balanchine Company, hanging with outstretched arm on a Chirico horse statue. Credit: Condé Nast Archive 1937 via Vogue Australia

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Tuesday 25 December 2012

Festive Table

 

Nature inspired table decore by the talented team Line Klein and stylist Camilla Larsson.

{Images: line klein}

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Tuesday 25 December 2012

Merry Christmas Tine K style

 

Have a happy day!

 

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Tuesday 25 December 2012

Beautiful Christmas Decoration by Anna Malin

 

Great Christmas decorations by Anna Malin of “Helt Enkelt”.

 

{Images: anna malin. Anna has created the paper tree, visit here}

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