Sunday 10 June 2012

Jubilations!

 

Hooray for the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee ~ the high street stores join the strattera without prescription celebrations. Take a royal curtsy and discount generic cialis online congratulate Her Majesty on sixty wonderful years.

Personalised stationery seller, Smythson celebrating the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee with a floral tribute to the tastemakers of the era of Her Majesty’s Coronation. The window displays were created in collaboration with British illustrator Kerry Lemon, and recreates a quintessential English Rose garden, inspired by the photography of Cecil Beaton and the innovative style and colour palette used by royal florist Constance Spry.

Browns :: store windows have been decorated with an array of patriotic elements. To complete the regal display a creative team, including Ivana Nohel who has designed our origamipaper animals, and the throne and crest illustration by Gemma Milly {see top image}.

Floral Guards Regiment of two rose-jacketed sentries standing to attention outside Hackett.

 

{Images via window display blog}

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Sunday 10 June 2012

Union Jacks + Crowns + Corgis

 

Corgi Blimey ~ Union Jacks, Corgis and Crowns everywhere!

Ted Baker called on corgi friends to welcome customers into the usa generic levitra flag-decked shop.

Corgi Maamite Campaign ~ do you love or hate it?

Nicola Waymark, Marketing Manager for Unilever UK comments: “We wanted to create a campaign that not only remained true to the Marmite brand but also communicated its very British sense of humour. 2012 is a big year for Britain, and with Marmite celebrating its 110th Anniversary in the same year as the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee, we felt it was important to mark the occasion…” The Maamite campaign was developed at DDB UK, London.

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Sunday 10 June 2012

Cecil + Elizabeth

 

To celebrate Her Majesty the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee, the Victoria and viagra 25 mg Albert Museum unveiled an exhibition of 60 royal photographs by Cecil Beaton (1904-1980).

Queen Elizabeth II by Cecil Beaton: A Diamond Jubilee Celebration

From teenage Princess, to mother and sovereign,

the Queen posed for Cecil Beaton’s camera on many occasions from the 1940s to the 1960s.

Queen Elizabeth II, White Drawing Room, 1968 :: The Queen wore a turquoise silk sleeveless shift dress with silver floral embroidery designed by Hardy Amies. 

Queen Elizabeth II in the robes of Sovereign of the Order of the Garter. Music Room, Buckingham Palace 1968


The Queen wearing the Admiral’s Boat Cloak

Some extra tid bits

The Order of the Garter was founded by King Edward III in 1348. It is the most senior British order of chivalry. The Queen wears the robes of the Sovereign of the Order: the blue riband (or sash) and the dark blue velvet mantle, on which is pinned the Garter Star. The star comprises the St George’s Cross within the Garter, surrounded by radiating silver beams. St George is the patron saint of the Order.

The Coronation portraits were widely published and the Queen sent out numerous presentation prints as official gifts. Copies of this full-length portrait were given to the royal family and members of Prince Philip’s family. The Queen’s Coronation gown was designed by couturier Norman Hartnell and exquisitely embroidered with the floral emblems of the countries of the Commonwealth.

The photographs of the British royal family by Sir Cecil Beaton (1904-1980) were central to shaping the monarchy’s public image in the mid-20th century. Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II was still a young princess when she first sat for Beaton in 1942. Over the next three decades he would be invited to photograph the Queen on many significant occasions, including her Coronation Day in 1953.

{Images: Cecil Beaton via Victoria and Albert Museum}

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Sunday 10 June 2012

It’s time to celebrate all things British!

 

Diamond Jubilee of Her Most Gracious Majesty.

QUEEN ELIZABETH II NUDE PORTRAIT from ‘Nude series’ by international fine art painter Karine Percheron Daniels.

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Sunday 10 June 2012

Princess Elizabeth

 

Regal and beautiful ~ these black and white photos capture a younger Queen ELizabeth II.

Elizabeth Alexandra Mary. Born April 21, 1926 at 17 Bruton Street, Mayfair, to Prince Albert, Duke of York (later King George VI) and Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon, the Dutchess of York.

The family called her Lilibet.

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Sunday 3 June 2012

Bedecked in jewels, Queen Elizabeth 11

 

Jewellery and Gown :: Her Majesty arrived for State Opening of British Parliament wearing a silver gown with crystal embellishments, and a stunning white fur coats.

The Crown :: The Queen wears the King George IV State Diadem crown.

Made by Rundell, Bridge & Rundell in 1820, the diadem features a set of 4 crosses pattée alternating with 4 bouquets of roses, thistles, and shamrocks. The motifs are set on a band of diamond scrollwork between two bands of pearls. The front cross is set with a 4 carat yellow diamond, and the piece features 1,333 diamonds in all.

The crown was made for King George IV. George was a flamboyant man with an extravagant sense of style. The 57-year-old waited a long time to become king, and he wanted his coronation to be the most extravagant one in history. He redesigned costumes and planned for changes and additions to the Crown regalia. To commemorate the relatively recent creation of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, George came up with a new motif: a bouquet of Scotland’s thistle, England’s rose, and Ireland’s shamrock.

Queen Elizabeth II started wearing the diadem after her accession in 1952. She wears it to and from each State Opening of Parliament and for official portraits. That combination of uses has made it one of the most recognizable symbols of her reign ~ it adorns stamps, money, and official images.

The Festoon Necklace :: the three strand diamond necklace was commissioned in 1947 by King George VI to find a use to some of the loose diamonds he had inherited. The necklace consists of three rows of diamonds suspended between two diamond triangles, containing over 150 brilliant cut diamonds. The minimum weight of the necklace is estimated to be 175 carats. Matching diamond earrings were worn.

After arriving, she puts on the Parliament Robe of State and generic viagra order softtabs online the insignia of the Order of Garter. As is the custom, the Monarch doesn’t put on the Imperial State Crown (which arrives separately) until after she enters the Palace of Westminster.

{Source: Order of Splendor}

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Sunday 3 June 2012

pageantry, pomp and ceremony

 

Steeped in centuries old tradition, Britain is having a BIG year of Royal pageantry. In great pomp, Queen Elizabeth II, resplendent in diamonds, officially opened British Parliament on May 9, 2012.

HISTORY :: tradition & colour

Before the Queen travels to Parliament from Buckingham Palace, formally to open each new session of Parliament, certain historical “precautions” are observed.

The Yeomen of the Guard, the oldest of the royal bodyguards known as “Beefeaters”, armed with lanterns, searches the cellars of the Palace of Westminster. The tradition dates back to the Gunpowder Plot of November 5, 1605, when Guy Fawkes attempted to blow up the building and King James I with it. This is followed by a more rigorous police search. Another tradition sees a government whip held “hostage” at the Palace to ensure the Queen’s safe return. The hostage is released upon the safe return of the Queen.

This tradition stems from the time of Charles I, who had a contentious relationship with Parliament and was eventually beheaded in 1649 at the conclusion of a civil war between the monarchy and Parliament. In 1642 Charles I stormed into the House of Commons in an unsuccessful attempt to arrest five of its members for treason. Since that time no British monarch has been permitted to enter the House of Commons, which is why the opening is conducted in the House of Lords.

Before the arrival of the sovereign, The Regalia – the Imperial State Crown, the Cap of Maintenance and Sword of State travel from the Victoria Tower in their own carriage, ahead of the monarch, escorted by Members of the Royal Household.

The Queen travels from Buckingham Palace in the horse-drawn Australian State Coach to Westminster, escorted by the Household Cavalry Mounted Regiment. As she arrives, the Union Flag of the U.K. will be lowered and her Royal Standard raised over Parliament.

Black Rod :: At 11:30 a.m., once Her Majesty arrived and viagra at discount price was seated on the Throne, her official messenger who has the title Yeoman Usher of the Black Rod will march to the House of Commons, the lower, elected, chamber. His job is to summon lawmakers to hear the queen, who will be waiting in the House of Lords. By tradition, the door of the Commons is slammed in Black Rod’s face to symbolise the independence of the Members of the Parliament. To be let in, he was required to pound on the door three times with his rod.

This ritual symbolizes the independence of the Commons from the Crown: no British monarch has entered the lower house since 1642, when King Charles I tried to arrest five members in the run-up to a civil war that ended with his execution in 1649.

After “Black Rod” has knocked on the door of the Commons, lawmakers process to the House of Lords. Seated on a gilded throne next to her husband, the Duke of Edinburgh, Queen Elizabeth delivers a speech unveiling the government’s legislative program.

The Queen reads a prepared speech, known as the “Speech from the Throne” or the “Queen’s Speech”, outlining her Government’s agenda for the coming year. The speech is not written by the Queen, but rather by the Cabinet, and reflects the legislative agenda for which they seek the agreement of both Houses of Parliament. It is traditionally written on goatskin vellum or parchment, and presented for Her Majesty to read by the Lord Chancellor.

{Images: via Daily Mail. Wonderful collage photo by Loren Cooper.}

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Friday 1 June 2012

Lego Queen Elizabeth II gets diamond crown

 

Lego models of Queen Elizabeth in a real diamond-encrusted silver crown with the royal family at Buckingham palace has gone on display in time for the diamond jubilee.

The 10-centimetre high figure of the Queen was revealed at the Legoland theme park in Windsor, just a few miles from Windsor Palace. It depicts the monarch dressed in white, wearing a blue sash — the Garter Riband, and the crown {designed by jeweller Dinny Hall} with 48 real diamonds sitting atop her grey curls.

This is not the first time that Lego has depicted the queen and other members of British royalty. The toy company took on the Royal Wedding in 2011, creating figures of Prince William and Catherine the Duchess of Cambridge, along with a more toned-down figure of the Queen dressed in a yellow suit and hat. Lego models of distinguished guests included the Beckhams, Sir Elton John, and Sir Paul McCartney.

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Tuesday 29 May 2012

Chandon Miniature Chairs

 

Chandon Champagne and Living Edge have formed a great partnership to present Miniature Cork Chair Competitions in Australia. Numerous delicately crafted designs are the result of the competition being held in three cities over the past couple of years. The Brisbane display at In Design Live on the weekend was a highlight for me.

Artists and architects are invited to fashion a miniature chair using two corks, wire cages and foils,with designs judged on their originality, wit, artistry and craftsmanship.

The chairs featured below are from the Melbourne exhibition, with photos by Christian Mushenko.

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Tuesday 29 May 2012

golden jewelled

 

Beautiful beading embellishment.

{Images:  Valentino S/S Haute Couture Show 2012 via Vogue Australia}

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