Monday 13 August 2012

    the flame

     

    Summer Olympics 2012, London :: the flame, by designer Thomas Heatherwick, is extinguished…

    The Olympic cauldron was broken up at the closing ceremony and each of its 204 copper ‘petals’ given to the competing nations as a souvenir. At the opening  ceremony, the climax was the individual flames spreading between the petals, converging on the cauldron to create one giant flame.

    The cauldron was developed at the Heatherwick Studio in Kings Cross, London, which Heatherwick founded in 1994 with the aim of “bringing architecture, design and sculpture together within a single practice. He has since gained international acclaim for his work in producing ground breaking designs in architecture, sculpture, urban infrastructure and furniture design.

    Perhaps his most recognised design includes the new “Boris Bus”. After the Mayor of London rejected the “bendy-buses” introduced by the previous mayor Ken Livingstone, Heatherwick was asked to oversee a sleek update of the traditional and much loved Routemaster, incorporating the all important “hop-on hop-off” service with an open platform at the back.

    History of the Torch

    The ancient Greeks revered the power of fire. In Greek mythology, the god Prometheus stole fire from Zeus and gave it to humans. To celebrate the passing of fire from Prometheus to man, the Greeks would hold relay races. Athletes would pass a lit torch to one another until the winner reached the finish line.

     And so it began: Actress Ino Menegaki (right), in the role of the High Priestess,lights the torch of the Olympic Flame during the Lighting Ceremony in front of the Hera Temple in Ancient Olympia

    The Greeks held their first Olympic Games in 776 B.C. The Games, held every four years at Olympia, honored Zeus and other Greek gods. The Olympics also marked the beginning of a period of peace for the often warring Greeks. At the start of the Games, runners called “heralds of peace” would travel throughout Greece, declaring a “sacred truce” to all wars between rival city-states. The truce would remain in place for the duration of the games, so that spectators could safely travel to the Olympics.

    A constantly burning flame was a regular fixture throughout Greece. It usually graced the altars of the Greek gods. In Olympia, there was an altar dedicated to Hera, goddess of birth and marriage. At the start of the Olympic Games, the Greeks would ignite a cauldron of flames upon Hera’s altar. They lit the flame using a hollow disc or mirror called a skaphia, which, much like the modern parabolic mirror, focused the sun’s rays into a single point to light the flame. The flame would burn throughout the Games as a sign of purity, reason, and peace.

    The Greeks stopped holding their Olympic Games after about a thousand years, and the torch relays and lighting of the flame also stopped. The Olympic Games reemerged in 1896, when the first modern Games were held in Athens.

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    Sunday 12 August 2012

    so sweet

     

    Petals + Dessert :: A beautiful combination of art, fleur and dessert.

    Pinched Rosewater & Rhubarb Macaroons for Sweet Paul Magazine.

    Recipes & Food Styling by Diana Perrin of Casa de Perrin, Prop Styling & Artwork by Alicia Buszczak and Photography by Bricco.

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    Sunday 12 August 2012

    mojito shoe

     

    Not the drink ~ how yummy is this shoe! Very curious about the functionality… I think it may require gymnastic skills to walk.

    Mojito shoe by architects Hakes Associates.

    {Image via Urban TasterDeezen}

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    Sunday 12 August 2012

    white flower

     

    Simplicity :: white order

    {Image via bienenkiste}

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    Sunday 12 August 2012

    white teepee

     

    This would have been the perfect escape when I was struck down with the flu last week,

    an inspiring space to rest, read and dream.

    {Image via Lolita}

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    Sunday 12 August 2012

    getting back on the carousel!

     

    I’m back in the blogging saddle, and hopefully this time there won’t be all those obstacles…

    Absence doth sharpen love, presence strengthens it;

    the one brings fuel, the other blows it till it burns clear. William Shakespeare

    {Image: 1. Louis Vuitton Spring/Summer 2012 Collection 2. Lisbon carousel via This is glamorous}

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    Sunday 12 August 2012

    Queen Charlotte Track, New Zealand

     

    What have I been doing instead of blogging ~ as you know I hiked the Queen Charlotte track.

    We walked, and walked and walked through rain and sunshine days.

    The beauty of the Marlborough Sounds.

    History :: The first known European to visit the Marlborough Sounds was the famous English explorer, Captain James Cook, on the HMS Endeavour.”Queen Charlotte” was the name he gave the Sound. The Maori name is “Totaranui”, reflecting the totara trees growing there.

    Cook sailed into Ship Cove, today the start of the Queen Charlotte Track, on January 17, 1770 and made this small cove his South Pacific base for the next seven years. It was here the first social interaction between South Island Maori and the European took place. (painting by  John Webber 1777, Royal Maritime Museum) When the first European pioneers arrived they travelled by boat and formed trails along the foreshore. Other parts of the track, created by private landowners and  initially know as the Kenepuru Walkway, passes over  farmland and ridge tops, adding to the diversity of the  walkway.

    The Queen Charlotte Track, from Ship Cove to Anakiwa,  was officially named and opened in 1991. Today the 71km track is a public/private partnership, made up of private land, Department of Conservation land and  Marlborough District Council “paper roads”.

    A highlight of the trip was catching the boat to Bay of Many Coves Resort for dinner. We enjoyed the exceptional hospitality of thei 5 star luxury resort from the moment we stepped onto the jetty at 4pm.

    The signature hot chocolate warmed our souls while we read glossy magazines and chatted nonchalantly.

    As the sunset the Taittinger champagne was popped and our gourmet experience began.

    Executive Chef, Hannes Bareiter. Hannes has a natural flare for creative gastronomy that delighted our senses. All the dishes were superb, and feeling very sated we returned to the boat to head home. Next time we must stay the night!

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    Monday 9 July 2012

    natural friendship

     

    The joy time spent with girlfriends and being with nature is beautifully captured in these pics.

    Romantic Hiking, Vogue Korea

    ModelsLee Ji Yeon & Song Jae Rum

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    Saturday 7 July 2012

    hiking escape

     

    Where have I been? Hiking the stunning Marlborough Sounds of New Zealand!

    Nine girlfriends armed with boots, thermals and gortex jackets  {yes it did rain!}

    shared the challenge of walking 71 kms along the Queen Charlotte Track.

    And I love all those Union Jacks!

    Mario Testino photographed Sasha Pivovarova: Morning Beauty, Vogue UK 2007

    I posted the full shoot here.

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    Saturday 16 June 2012

    Charming Hotel in Greece

     

    This breathtaking place is located on one of the most beautiful Greek islands - Mykonos.

    San Giorgio is a very charming hotel because its owners truly believe that “people are not seeking for luxury in a traditional definition any more” and offers to their visitors the fine taste of the 60s bohemian.

    This breathtaking place is located on one of the most beautiful Greek islands - MykonosSan Giorgio is a very charming hotel because its owners truly believe that “people are not seeking for luxury in a traditional definition any more” and offers to their visitors the fine taste of the 60s bohemian. On purpose here was created a very special atmosphere that will make you feel like you are at the summer home of your close friends.
    And with the Greek $ crisis this maybe more than day dreaming!
    {Images: San Giorgio via 79 Ideas via mind sparkle }

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